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Dr. Matteo Clinics

WHEN DO I NEED A TOOTH EXTRACTION?

If a tooth has been broken or damaged by decay, our specialist will try to fix it with a filling, crown or other treatment. Sometimes, though, there’s too much damage for the tooth to be repaired. In this case, the tooth needs to be extracted. A very loose tooth also will require extraction if it can’t be saved, even with bone replacement surgery (bone graft).

Here are other reasons why a tooth needs to be removed:

  • Some people have extra teeth that block other teeth from coming in.
  • Sometimes baby teeth don’t fall out in time to allow the permanent teeth to come in.
  • People getting braces may need teeth extracted to create room for the teeth that are being moved into place.
  • People receiving radiation to the head and neck may need to have teeth in the field of radiation extracted.
  • People receiving cancer drugs may develop infected teeth because these drugs weaken the immune system. Infected teeth may need to be extracted.
  • Some teeth may need to be extracted if they could become a source of infection after an organ transplant. People with organ transplants have a high risk of infection because they must take drugs that decrease or suppress the immune system.

Most simple extractions can be done using just an injection (a local anesthetic). You may or may not receive drugs to help you relax. For a surgical extraction, you will receive a local anesthetic, and you may also have anesthesia through a vein (intravenous). Some people may need general anesthesia. They include patients with specific medical or behavioral conditions and young children.

If you are receiving conscious sedation, you may be given steroids as well as other medicines in your IV line. The steroids help to reduce swelling and keep you pain-free after the procedure.

During a tooth extraction, you can expect to feel pressure, but no pain. If you feel any pain or pinching, tell your doctor.

AFTER CARE AND FOLLOW UP

Our specialist will give you detailed instructions on what to do and what to expect after your surgery. If you have any questions, make sure to ask them.
Having a tooth taken out is surgery. You can expect some discomfort after even simple extractions. Usually it is mild. You will be prescribed with pain relievers, Take the dose our doctor recommends. Take the first pills before the local anesthesia wears off. Continue taking them for 3 days. Ask our specialist for complete instructions.

Surgical extractions generally cause more pain after the procedure than simple extractions. The level of discomfort and how long it lasts will depend on how difficult it was to remove the tooth.

CALL US IN CASE OF:

  • The swelling gets worse instead of better.
  • You have fever, chills or redness
  • You have trouble swallowing
  • You have uncontrolled bleeding in the area
  • The area continues to ooze or bleed after the first 24 hours
  • Your tongue, chin or lip feels numb more than 3 to 4 hours after the procedure
  • The extraction site becomes very painful — This may be a sign that you have developed a dry socket.

If you have an infection, our specialist usually will prescribe antibiotics.